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Glasgow Mela to return to Kelvingrove Park for huge celebration of diversity

Glasgow Mela to return to Kelvingrove Park for huge celebration of diversity

The Glasgow Mela, the city’s annual celebration of its many diverse cultures and communities returns to Kelvingrove Park on Sunday 26 June, the charity Glasgow Life has confirmed.

As it was pre-pandemic, the event is free and un-ticketed and will feature local artists and performers and national and international acts.

As well as the programme running on-stage, more artists will be performing across the stunning setting of Kelvingrove Park throughout the day in an exciting programme of participatory activities, including a Mela Artist in Residence who will work with the audience to create artworks.

The Glasgow Mela will also offer visitors fantastic food and market vendors from midday on Sunday 26 June until 8pm as well as music, dance and performance.

Bailie Annette Christie, Chair of Glasgow Life, said: “The Glasgow Mela is a wonderful celebration of the cultural diversity of Glasgow and a terrific event that showcases the incredible talent of musicians and performers. It's an occasion which is best enjoyed in person in the beautiful surroundings of Kelvingrove Park, savouring the brilliant music and enjoying the innovative and exciting performances. If you can, please come and join in what will be a Glasgow Mela to remember.”

Glasgow Mela is being programmed by the Scottish-Asian Creative Artists Network, which said: “We’re delighted to be back to our usual format in Kelvingrove Park. We’ve missed the full Glasgow Mela experience as much as our audiences and can’t wait to bring you an exciting programme on and off the stage. We have some fantastic commissions this year continuing our mission to promote the visibility of artists and performers of South Asian heritage, their work and creativity.”

Coming from the Sanskrit word for “gathering”, the Glasgow Mela has become an eagerly anticipated fixture on the cultural calendar of the city.

Glasgow’s first Mela was in 1990 as part of the European City of Culture and was an indoor celebration at the then newly opened Tramway. It has since grown to a massive outdoor event, which attracts tens of thousands of visitors and hundreds of artists and performers from all over the world.