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Clare Hunter and Sue Lawrence Textiles & Treachery in the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots

Clare Hunter and Sue Lawrence Textiles & Treachery in the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots

Clare Hunter and Sue Lawrence Textiles & Treachery in the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots

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Book tickets

£11 (£10 ticket charge plus 10% Booking Fee)
Adult, Over 14s only. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.
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Dates and times

Saturday 7 May 2022
11:30AM - 12:30PM

In a fascinating mix of fact and fiction we explore the life of Mary, Queen of Scots.

At her execution Mary, Queen of Scots wore red. Widely known as the colour of strength and passion, it was in fact worn by Mary as the Catholic symbol of martyrdom.

In sixteenth-century Europe women's voices were suppressed and silenced. Even for a queen like Mary, her prime duty was to bear sons. In an age when textiles expressed power, Mary exploited them to emphasise her female agency. From her lavishly embroidered gowns as the prospective wife of the French Dauphin to the fashion dolls she used to encourage a Marian style at the Scottish court and the subversive messages she embroidered in captivity for her supporters, Mary used textiles to advance her political agenda, affirm her royal lineage and tell her own story.

In Embroidering Her Truth: Mary, Queen of Scots and the Language of Power, Clare Hunter exquisitely blends history, politics and memoir to tell the story of a queen in her own voice.

Scotland in 1567 was no place for a woman and Mary, Queen of Scots, is forced to abdicate in favour of her infant son. Sue Lawrence’s The Green Lady is a shocking tale of intrigue, secrets, treachery and murder, based on true events, but seen from a different perspective than is found in most history books. Casting a fascinating light on the ruthless nature of power, the story highlights the precarious position of sixteenth-century women, even those in the most privileged of circumstances.

Venue Map

Venue

Mitchell Library

North Street, Glasgow, G3 7DN